Silent Victims/Vittime SilenzioseSilent Victims

Today I’m particularly glad to welcome in Shoot4Change the excellent spanish photographer Omar Havana. He is currently living in Cambodia and after being feautered in international media (have a look at his website and you’ll realise it) he decided to show us his project about landmine survivors and those who help them.

Ngos that have collaborated with his Project are Cambodian Mine Action Center (CMAC)  and Handicap International.

AA

Landmine Survivors

(by Omar Havana 2012)

(CLICK TO SEE THE COMPLETE PHOTO GALLERY) Although disable people have limited access to health care, education, employment, transport and leisure activities, their needs are very often not taken into account in international development projects

Cambodia is one of the most heavily mined areas in the world; some estimates run as high as ten million mines (in a country of 11.5 million people), though the Cambodian Mine Action Center (CMAC) estimates 4 to 6 million mines. Cambodia is also littered with other kinds of unexploded ordinance (UXO), left over from half a million tons of bombs dropped on Cambodia by the United States in the late 60s and early 70s.

Cambodia suffers from the effects of cultural models that are often demeaning to the poor, the category to which the vast majority of people with disabilities and victims of chronic diseases there belong. A direct consequence of such stigma is the lack of consideration given vulnerable households in public policies.

Handicap International supports and fosters local groups targeted at people with disabilities and victims of chronic disease. The organization takes an inclusive approach in its disease and injury prevention work as well as social work, but priority is given to people with disabilities and victims of chronic disease. Services are reserved for these individuals first, and then opened to the community.

(CLICK TO SEE THE COMPLETE PHOTO GALLERY) Prosthetics and rehabilitation is one of the main action focus for the international organization Handicap International in Cambodia

The Cambodia program is targeted in particular at women, children (disabled or at risk from disability), people with physical disabilities and poor groups living in rural areas. In the next several years we hope to add services for people with sensory or mental disabilities.

 Omar Havana

 

Ngos that have collaborated with the Project:

Cambodian Mine Action Center (CMAC)

Handicap International

Today I’m particularly glad to welcome in Shoot4Change the excellent spanish photographer Omar Havana. He is currently living in Cambodia and after being feautered in international media (have a look at his website and you’ll realise it) he decided to show us his project about landmine survivors and those who help them.

Ngos that have collaborated with his Project are Cambodian Mine Action Center (CMAC)  and Handicap International.

AA

Landmine Survivors

(by Omar Havana 2012)

(CLICK TO SEE THE COMPLETE PHOTO GALLERY) Although disable people have limited access to health care, education, employment, transport and leisure activities, their needs are very often not taken into account in international development projects

Cambodia is one of the most heavily mined areas in the world; some estimates run as high as ten million mines (in a country of 11.5 million people), though the Cambodian Mine Action Center (CMAC) estimates 4 to 6 million mines. Cambodia is also littered with other kinds of unexploded ordinance (UXO), left over from half a million tons of bombs dropped on Cambodia by the United States in the late 60s and early 70s.

Cambodia suffers from the effects of cultural models that are often demeaning to the poor, the category to which the vast majority of people with disabilities and victims of chronic diseases there belong. A direct consequence of such stigma is the lack of consideration given vulnerable households in public policies.

Handicap International supports and fosters local groups targeted at people with disabilities and victims of chronic disease. The organization takes an inclusive approach in its disease and injury prevention work as well as social work, but priority is given to people with disabilities and victims of chronic disease. Services are reserved for these individuals first, and then opened to the community.

(CLICK TO SEE THE COMPLETE PHOTO GALLERY) Prosthetics and rehabilitation is one of the main action focus for the international organization Handicap International in Cambodia

The Cambodia program is targeted in particular at women, children (disabled or at risk from disability), people with physical disabilities and poor groups living in rural areas. In the next several years we hope to add services for people with sensory or mental disabilities.

 Omar Havana

 

Ngos that have collaborated with the Project:

Cambodian Mine Action Center (CMAC)

Handicap International




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