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Ci si indigna anche a Kuala LumpurProtests in Kuala Lumpur


 (News from Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. By Amanda Ting/S4C KL)

Last Saturday, a small group of Malaysians in Kuala Lumpur (about 400 people) gathered at the iconic Kuala Lumpur City Centre (KLCC) park to protest against a new Peacefully Assembly Bill proposed by the repressive government. Among the content of the bill is that citizens are not allowed to protest on the streets or within 50 metres of a school, house of worship, hospital or open public spaces.

(photo: Amanda Ting/S4C KL) click to see the gallery

Notice has to be given to the police 10 days prior to the protest to which an approval is not guaranteed and location of protest is subjected to the approval of the Home Minister. Non citizens and children under 15 years of age are not allowed to protest and any protest prior to approval, the police will fine the organisers MYR 20,000. Although the KLCC management switched on the sprinklers that day, it did not deter any of the protesters and the event went on for about 2 hours before the crowd dispersed peacefully.

The government has bulldozed the bill through the Lower House and despite protests from citizens and the Opposition parties, the ruling government approved the bill within days and now pending approval from the Senate. Citizens will continue their peaceful protests every Saturday through big scale picnics and other fun activities at public spaces by wearing yellow and without the approval of the authority. For your info, Yellow is a colour known to Malaysians as a spin off from the Bersih 2.0 movement demanding for clean and fair election and now a symbol of defiance against senseless laws and saving Malaysia from iron fist rulers.

(photo: Amanda ting/S4C Kuala Lumpur) Click to see the gallery

Background:


Malaysia is a multi racial country rich with a mixture of different ethnicity and culture, where everyone lives in tolerance, peace and harmony. Street protests used to be a thing of the past when our forefathers fought for our country’s independence. However, for the past 2 decades, slowly the rights for citizens to openly express their dissatisfaction with the current regime has been taken away and now the public is now calling the government to return the power and rights to the people. Freedom of expression is guaranteed in the country’s Constitution in Article 10.

 Therefore, this bill and the current Police Act is redundant and not consistent with the Constitution.

Citizens are slowly going back to the streets to demand what is rightfully theirs despite of threats and brainwashing by the Government.

We, Malaysians believe that we are a mature society who can protest in peace.

Amanda Ting/S4C Kuala Lumpur


P/S: The Constitution of Malaysia is the most amended in the world thanks to the ruling party’s hunger to hold on to power. We have been ruled by the same party for over 50 years.

 
[iframe http://www.s4c.it/slides/klprotest 100% 800px]


(News from Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. By Amanda Ting/S4C KL)

Last Saturday, a small group of Malaysians in Kuala Lumpur (about 400 people) gathered at the iconic Kuala Lumpur City Centre (KLCC) park to protest against a new Peacefully Assembly Bill proposed by the repressive government. Among the content of the bill is that citizens are not allowed to protest on the streets or within 50 metres of a school, house of worship, hospital or open public spaces.

(photo: Amanda Ting/S4C KL) click to see the gallery

Notice has to be given to the police 10 days prior to the protest to which an approval is not guaranteed and location of protest is subjected to the approval of the Home Minister. Non citizens and children under 15 years of age are not allowed to protest and any protest prior to approval, the police will fine the organisers MYR 20,000. Although the KLCC management switched on the sprinklers that day, it did not deter any of the protesters and the event went on for about 2 hours before the crowd dispersed peacefully.

The government has bulldozed the bill through the Lower House and despite protests from citizens and the Opposition parties, the ruling government approved the bill within days and now pending approval from the Senate. Citizens will continue their peaceful protests every Saturday through big scale picnics and other fun activities at public spaces by wearing yellow and without the approval of the authority. For your info, Yellow is a colour known to Malaysians as a spin off from the Bersih 2.0 movement demanding for clean and fair election and now a symbol of defiance against senseless laws and saving Malaysia from iron fist rulers.

(photo: Amanda ting/S4C Kuala Lumpur) Click to see the gallery

Background:


Malaysia is a multi racial country rich with a mixture of different ethnicity and culture, where everyone lives in tolerance, peace and harmony. Street protests used to be a thing of the past when our forefathers fought for our country’s independence. However, for the past 2 decades, slowly the rights for citizens to openly express their dissatisfaction with the current regime has been taken away and now the public is now calling the government to return the power and rights to the people. Freedom of expression is guaranteed in the country’s Constitution in Article 10.

Therefore, this bill and the current Police Act is redundant and not consistent with the Constitution.

Citizens are slowly going back to the streets to demand what is rightfully theirs despite of threats and brainwashing by the Government.

We, Malaysians believe that we are a mature society who can protest in peace.

Amanda Ting/S4C Kuala Lumpur


P/S: The Constitution of Malaysia is the most amended in the world thanks to the ruling party’s hunger to hold on to power. We have been ruled by the same party for over 50 years.

 
[iframe http://www.s4c.it/slides/klprotest 100% 800px]




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